Measuring Access to Justice

Justice depends on having a fair chance to be heard, regardless of who you are, where you live, or how much money you have. At minimum, a person should be able to learn about her rights and then give effective voice to them in a neutral and nondiscriminatory, formal or informal, process that determines the facts, applies the rule of law, and enforces the result.

That is Access to Justice.

The Justice Index 2016

The Attorney Access Index

The Self-Representation Index

The Language Access Index

The Disability Access Index

52

<1

48%

50%

60%

50 States, DC, and Puerto Rico

6,100+ Data Points

3,000+ Written Citations

110+ Indicators

There is less than one civil legal aid attorney to help every 10,000 Americans living in poverty.

Overall score for practices to make justice accessible to people without lawyers.

Half of the jurisdictions have no rule against making non-English speakers pay for a court interpreter.

Highest overall score of any of Justice Index 2016’s four categories.

The Justice Index 2016

52

50 States, DC, and Puerto Rico

6,100+ Data Points

3,000+ Written Citations

110+ Indicators

See the data >

The Attorney Access Index

<1

There is less than one civil legal aid attorney to help every 10,000 Americans living in poverty.

See the data >

The Self-Representation Index

48%

Overall score for practices to make justice accessible to people without lawyers.

See the data >

The Language Access Index

50%

Half of the jurisdictions have no rule against making non-English speakers pay for a court interpreter.

See the data >

The Disability Access Index

60%

Highest overall score of any of Justice Index 2016’s four categories.

See the data >